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«12. . .1,2601,2611,2621,2631,2641,2651,266. . .1,5411,542»

What’s up my people!!

My Nation, Ulymein, and Free falnesia

Free falnesia

Crystalsummer wrote:What’s up my people!!

Just the ceiling, nothing up there =P

Free falnesia wrote:Just the ceiling, nothing up there =P

I see skies of blue lol. How are you?

Crystalsummer wrote:What’s up my people!!

I am reading boring telegrams
Also I like your flag

Free falnesia

Crystalsummer wrote:I see skies of blue lol. How are you?

heh, stargazing huh? I'm good, and you?

Free falnesia wrote:Indeed. It always makes me think that when we finally found the answer to this question, the answer will be quite surprising. I mean, the universe is incredibly large. It is so vast that it is impossible that the is not a single life outside of Earth. Yet, when we finally realised that there is life, it will be a surprise to the scientific community because of this Paradox, in which why we put out these theories of either there is life or not out there, "there is life, duh" that kind of thinking you know.

But the opposite also true, if for millions of years (if our species survives that long) we search the cosmos and yet not found a single planet in which even microbes exist, thus answering the "life only exist on Earth" part of the Paradox, how surprising and madness it will be since the universe is so large and vast that not a single life exist outside of our planet at all.

Scary right?

Yes, it's scary. If we're alone it's a huge responsibility on our shoulders. If we go extinct the light of consciousness and intelligence would fade away for ever. No one would be there anymore to think about the universe in all its glory. No one there anymore to understand this universe...
I hope we're not the only intelligent species out there...

Anyway, I'm confident that there should be at least microbial life on other planets. Single-cell organisms don't have high expectations regarding their environment. I mean life on Earth goes back really far. It started almost immediatelly after our planet formed and nowhere close to how it's like today.

"The earliest time that life forms first appeared on Earth is at least 3.77 billion years ago, possibly as early as 4.28 billion years, or even 4.5 billion years; not long after the oceans formed 4.41 billion years ago, and after the formation of the Earth 4.54 billion years ago. The earliest direct evidence of life on Earth are microfossils of microorganisms permineralized in 3.465-billion-year-old Australian Apex chert rocks."
That's from Wikipedia.

My conclusion is that life in general should be almost everywhere. But more complex or even intelligent life should be very very rare, I think.

Ulymein and Free falnesia

Milaredo wrote:I am reading boring telegrams
Also I like your flag

Thank you!!

Crystalsummer wrote:Thank you!!

What program did you make it with? I made mine with paint

Crystalsummer
Why don't you enter to WA? I want to endorse you

I Learned to mention nations
Everyone: Noob things

Free falnesia

Emaha wrote:Yes, it's scary. If we're alone it's a huge responsibility on our shoulders. If we go extinct the light of consciousness and intelligence would fade away for ever. No one would be there anymore to think about the universe in all its glory. No one there anymore to understand this universe...
I hope we're not the only intelligent species out there...

Anyway, I'm confident that there should be at least microbial life on other planets. Single-cell organisms don't have high expectations regarding their environment. I mean life on Earth goes back really far. It started almost immediatelly after our planet formed and nowhere close to how it's like today.

"The earliest time that life forms first appeared on Earth is at least 3.77 billion years ago, possibly as early as 4.28 billion years, or even 4.5 billion years; not long after the oceans formed 4.41 billion years ago, and after the formation of the Earth 4.54 billion years ago. The earliest direct evidence of life on Earth are microfossils of microorganisms permineralized in 3.465-billion-year-old Australian Apex chert rocks."
That's from Wikipedia.

My conclusion is that life in general should be almost everywhere. But more complex or even intelligent life should be very very rare, I think.

I agree, their existence is rare and requires a specific part of the recipe. The Goldilocks Zone is one such recipe, though if we focused on the idea that life needed liquid water and a form of nitrogen/oxygen atmosphere to exist. There maybe some other form of life that can survive outside the Goldilocks Zone, perhaps ones on a volcanic-early world, which based on sulpheric based lifeform, or gasses based lifeform in Gas-class world.

Post by Milaredo suppressed by Ulymein.

Free Nations Region
Hansdeltania It is not SPAM
Go to this link and wave your flag:
https://loderunner.github.io/flagwaver/

Post by Milaredo suppressed by Ulymein.

Hansdeltania

No one has paid me to do it, it's voluntary

Free falnesia wrote:I agree, their existence is rare and requires a specific part of the recipe. The Goldilocks Zone is one such recipe, though if we focused on the idea that life needed liquid water and a form of nitrogen/oxygen atmosphere to exist. There maybe some other form of life that can survive outside the Goldilocks Zone, perhaps ones on a volcanic-early world, which based on sulpheric based lifeform, or gasses based lifeform in Gas-class world.

Yeah, it's all true what you said.
But the habitable zone and water cannot be the only requirements. I guess you already know that but I only feel like pointing that out again. We've already found dozens of planets that are in the habitable zone and could have liquid water. And we only found 4000 exoplanets in total so far with a heavy bias towards larger gas giants orbiting close to their stars. Our techniques mostly detect planets like them.
There must be millions of planets in our galaxy alone that have liquid water on their surfaces.

Free falnesia

Post self-deleted by Ulymein.

Milaredo wrote:Free Nations Region
Hansdeltania It is not SPAM
Go to this link and wave your flag:
https://loderunner.github.io/flagwaver/

Why do you keep @ing Hansdeltania? Don't @ people/the same person, in every post you make. If you keep spamming we will keep suppressing your posts.

Hi

India-bengal

Ello

Post by Milaredo suppressed by My Nation.

Okay OKAY MAN OKAY OKAY but it was voluntary no one paid me to do it ok. see... im not @ing anyone in this post are you happy?

La Montevideo wrote:Hi

Hi
Tu hablas español?

Post by Milaredo suppressed by ASEAN Maharlika.

Ulymein wrote:Why do you keep @ing Hansdeltania? Don't @ people/the same person, in every post you make. If you keep spamming we will keep suppressing your posts.

Okay OKAY MAN OKAY OKAY but it was voluntary no one paid me to do it ok. see... im not @ing anyone in this post are you happy?

...sí?

Milaredo wrote:Hi
Tu hablas español?

Sí.

Me imagino que eres de Uruguay

Free falnesia

Emaha wrote:Yeah, it's all true what you said.
But the habitable zone and water cannot be the only requirements. I guess you already know that but I only feel like pointing that out again. We've already found dozens of planets that are in the habitable zone and could have liquid water. And we only found 4000 exoplanets in total so far with a heavy bias towards larger gas giants orbiting close to their stars. Our techniques mostly detect planets like them.
There must be millions of planets in our galaxy alone that have liquid water on their surfaces.

That is true. My thinking on that we haven't found any complex life yet is due to 2 things:
1. Our scanning/observing technology. Our tech is not yet able to observed the universe in near-present time. What we see is the past after all, and to make it more depressing, the observable area is comparatively tiny to the galaxy as a whole. If there are interstellar species out there, they may as well be outside our tiny observable area, since they probably have tech to reach us by now, if not contact us when we finally begun our effort towards space during the cold war.

2. We may be the earliest, if not the very first advanced species in our galaxy. If one of the Fermi Paradox theory which states that we are the earliest or first advance species is true, what we currently observed on those probable habitable planets which may contain life, we are seeing their past, in which it is on the microbes stages or even much earlier. After all, the closest system to us is already few million light years away, in which we are seeing it in million years in its past.

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