by Max Barry

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DispatchFactbookTrivia

by The Confederation of Norse Inuit Union. . 53 reads.

Sites To Visit

Most Famous Places
Sedna-Odinland Castle/Temple is a temple/castle of the North Polean religion. In fact it is the holiest site in that religion. Construction was started in 1441 and was completed in 1450. This site is also a world heritage site. This temple gets 2,000 visitors per day. It also has a statue of the stone giant Xiqi right next to it. The temple is 150 meters long.


Picture of the temple.

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Videos a bit awkward but I think its better than the other videos Ive made. Also sometimes the quality cuts out so sorry about that.
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The NIU Community Center or Gathering Commons was a huge community center built in Nuuk in 1430 and completed in 1439. It is 270 meters tall and can fit up to 10,000 people, however it usually gets around 250 visitors a day. It was mainly made to show how great the NIU was and what its people were capable of. It is still being used today as a community center and a tourist attraction. The video at the bottom is the community center in 1439.

Sorry about the bits of lag and awkwardness in my voice, hopefully you still find this entertaining and informing.

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Fort Akeson was a fort built in 1417, the year the founder of the NIU (Norse Inuit Union), Rune Akeson, died in Nanortalik. The fort was completed in 1418. The fort is close to the grave of Akeson and serves multiple purposes. It serves as a religious center, social gathering center, a port for weapons and food, and a place for defense. The picture of the fort I am about to show you is from 1442.


Picture of the fort

LinkVideo of fort

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Nanortalik Stave Church is a church built in 1974 and was the first church to ever be built in the NIU excluding the other Norse that arrived there but left before them. The church could fit 146 people. The church is 100 feet tall. There were also a few trees planted there that originate from Scandinavia.

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Iqaluit Inuit Temple was a temple built in 1577 for the Inuit religion. It could fit about 200 people. Inside it contains the symbol of Sedna (the Inuit Sea Goddess) in the middle of the room as well as some Inuit artwork on the floor.

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Sedna-Odinland Inuit Temple was a temple which construction started in 1384 and finished in 1386. It is a temple for the Inuit religion. It could fit about 500 people. It contains Inuit artwork on the floor of the temple that would inspire other art for later temples and contributed a lot to Inuit art in general.

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Sedna-Odinland Great Hof is a Norse Hof (Heaven Hof) built in 1386 in Sedna-Odinland. Although it looks like its a two floor building it actually has three floors but with the third one being really small. It is 74 meters high and can fit about 800 people.

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Other Places
All of these sites were made in 1375 in Nanortalik and amongst these sites were the first Inuit and Norse temples ever built, and they are older than the nation itself. There is also a church that was built but it was not the first. The first Inuit and Norse temple are the second holiest site


Picture of the Norse Temple (to the left) and Church (to the right).

The Norse Temple could hold up to 71 people and the Church fit 49.


Picture of the Inuit Temple.

The Inuit temple could hold up to 127 people.

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Taloyoak Temple is a temple made in 1515 in the Inuktitut confederite of the NIU. It was made for the North Polean religion. It also contains two paintings, one of Odin disguised as a traveler searching for wisdom, and one of an evil giant. Multiple of these two paintings were copied and put all throughout the temple. The temple itself could fit up to 150 people.

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Inuvik temple was a temple built in 1567 in the Inuvialuktun confederite of the Norse Inuit Union for the North Polean religion. The temple also contains artwork of Odin when he had two eyes and of Fafnir as a Dragon, as well as the symbol of the Inuit Goddess Sedna on two of the walls. It also contains patterns inspired by Inuit art on the ground and some patterns that are inspired by the North Polean culture on one of the walls. The temple could fit around 100 people.

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The Nuuk Great Hof was a Norse Hof (Heaven Hof) whose construction started in 1525 and finished in 1526. It contains multiple paintings from the North Polean Rebirth (basically the NIU version of the renaissance). These paintings include dragons like Fafnir and Nhggr and Asgard. It is 94 meters high and can fit about 466 people. It has 4 floors. There were also a few trees planted there that originate from Scandinavia.

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Nuuk Stave Church was a stave church, or at least an attempt of one made in 1534. Although it is big it can only seat 19 people, including the preacher. It contains many paintings and artwork. This is a church for the religion of Catholicism. The church has two floors.

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Utqiagvik Inuit Temple is a temple for the Inuit religion made in 1656. One notable thing about this temple is instead of being a round igloo shape it is in the shape of an iceberg. The temple could fit up to 200 people. It is in the Iupiat Confederite of the NIU.

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Inuvik Inuit Temple is a Inuit temple built in 1634. It is more simple in design than other Inuit temples. It could fit up to 100 people. It is in the Inuvialuktun Confederite of the NIU.

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Tuktoyaktuk North Polean Temple is a temple for the North Polean religion made in 1643. The temple contains a painting of the god Nanook encountering an Inuit and two paintings of Fafnir. It is in the Inuvialuktun Confederite of the NIU. The Temple was made to hold about 45 people.

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Fafnir's Head temple is a really small temple that contains a sculpture of Fafnirs head. It is located in Nuuk and was created in 1388.

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Iqaluit Great Hof is a Heaven Hof made in 1911 for the Norse Religion. It is in the Inuktituk Confederite of the NIU. A Hof wasn't made there for so long as there was not a big amount of the believers of the Norse Religion for so long. The Hof also contains a painting of a Frost Giant and the painting was made in the same year.

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